Monday, July 9, 2012

The Mowing Devil Mystery

You may remember some of this as I posted on it last year.This appeared more recently...

"Jul 3rd in Ancient Mysteries by Nick Redfern
It’s a saga that many have heard of, but not so many know the story behind it. It’s the weird tale of the “Mowing Devil” – a strange legend that had its origins more than 300 years ago in England, and which has led to suggestions that Crop Circles have been with us for longer – far longer, actually – than many suspect. And it goes like this…
Jim Schnabel, Crop Circle researcher and author of the book Round in Circles, wrote that in 1989, Jenny Randles, a well-known British investigative writer on many things Fortean “…received a surprising piece of information from a local historian named Betty Puttick, from St. Albans, Hertfordshire [England]. Mrs. Puttick had just read Randles and [Paul] Fuller’s Controversy of the Circles, and it had reminded her of a seventeenth-century woodcut she had come across in a recent book on Hertfordshire folklore.”

Schnabel added, somewhat significantly, that the woodcut in question “…depicted a small, black, horned figure, scything down oatstalks along a circular path, leaving what appeared to be flaming stalks in his wake.”

It was dated 1678, and titled The Mowing-Devil: Or, Strange News out of Hartford-Shire. Written in the distinct (and very odd, as you’ll see!) style and spelling of the 1700s, it stated:

“In the said County lives a Rich industrious Farmer, who perceiving a small Crop of his (of about three Half-Acres of Land which he has sowed with Oats) to be Ripe and fit for Gathering, sent to a poor Neighbour whom he knew worked commonly in the Summer-time at Harvest Labour to agree with him about Mowing or Cutting the said Oats down.

“The poor man as it behoov’d [sic] Him endeavour’d [sic] to sell the Sweat of his Brows and Marrow of his Bones at as dear a Rate as reasonably he might, and therefore askt [sic] a good round Price for his Labour, which the farmer taking some exception at, bid him much more under the usual Rate than the poor Man askt [sic] for it: So that some sharp Words had past, when the Farmer told him he would Discourse with him no more about it.

“Whereupon the honest Mower recollecting with himself, that if he undertook not that little Spot of Work, he might thereby lose much more business which the Farmer had to imploy [sic] him in beside, ran after him, and told him that, rather than displease him, he would do it at what rate in Reason he pleas’d [sic]: and as an instance of his willingness to serve him, proposed to him a lower price, than he had Mowed for any time this Year before. The irretated [sic] Farmer with a stern look, and hasty gesture, told the poor man

“That the Devil himself should Mow his Oats before he should have anything to do with them, and upon this went his way, and left the sorrowful Yeoman, not a little troubled that he had disoblig’d [sic] one in whose Power it lay to do him many kindnesses.

Somewhat intriguingly, the reference to the field being “all of a Flame” the night before the curious formation was found in the field, was highly reminiscent of a similar incident from 1964 that occurred in the north of England. During the early part of 1995, while digging through a then-recently-declassified collection of British Ministry of Defense files on UFOs that were held at the National Archive at Kew, England, I was startled to find the following letter, submitted to the MoD, via the National Physical Laboratory at Teddington, on March 23, 1964. The subject matter was a curious, circular area of flattened ground found on land in the town of Penrith, Cumbria, England.

The Reverend T.E.T. Burbury – who took a personal interest in the affair – wrote:

“Does an apparent column of blue light about eight feet in diameter and about fifteen feet high which disappears and leaves a mark of very slightly disturbed earth, the same diameter, mean anything to you? I examined the ground which is about one hundred yards from the nearest building and there are no pylons near. There was no sign of burning, either by sight or smell; the grass growing between the exposed ground appeared quite normal. There were no signs of bird tracks or droppings: the ground simply appeared to have been lightly raked over in an almost perfect circle.”

For its part, records revealed to me, the Ministry of Defense dismissed the case as having no bearing on the defense or safety of the British Isles and wholly forgot about the matter. But, how notable, I thought: a Crop Circle-style formation that was believed to be the work of the Devil had appeared in southern England in 1678 – the night before which the field in question was seen to be “all of a flame” – and almost three hundred years later, something of a strikingly similar nature occurred in the north of England."

Maybe Crop Circles really are much older than many assume…
http://mysteriousuniverse.org/2012/07/the-mowing-devil-mystery/

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