Saturday, April 25, 2009

For sale on Loch Ness: Aleister Crowley's centre of dark sorcery

There is a real monster of Loch Ness and it is NOT "Nessie"

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Aleister Crowley
Born 12 October 1875(1875-10-12)
Royal Leamington Spa, Warwickshire, England
Died 1 December 1947 (aged 72)
Hastings, England

"Aleister Crowley, born Edward Alexander Crowley (pronounced /ˈkroʊli/), (12 October 1875 – 1 December 1947), was an English occultist, writer, mountaineer, poet, spy and yogi.[1] He was an influential member of several occult organizations, including the Golden Dawn, the A∴A∴, and Ordo Templi Orientis (O.T.O.),[2] and is best known today for his occult writings, especially The Book of the Law, the central sacred text of Thelema. He gained much notoriety during his lifetime, and was dubbed "The Wickedest Man In the World."[3]...

Crowley was also a chess player, painter, astrologer, hedonist, bisexual, drug experimenter, and social critic...

"His father, Edward Crowley, was trained as an engineer but according to Aleister, never worked as one[5]. He did, however, own shares in a lucrative family brewery business, which allowed him to retire before Aleister was born. Through his father's business he was an acquaintance of Aubrey Beardsley. His mother, Emily Bertha Bishop, drew roots from a Devon and Somerset family.[5] Both of his parents were Exclusive Brethren, a more conservative faction of the Plymouth Brethren.[6]...

Crowley grew up in a staunch Brethren household and was only allowed to play with children whose families followed the same faith. His father was a fanatical preacher, travelling around Britain and producing pamphlets. Daily Bible studies and private tutoring were mainstays in "Alick's" childhood...

After the death of his father to whom he was very close, he drifted from his religious upbringing, and his mother's efforts at keeping her son in the Christian faith only served to provoke his scepticism. When he was a child, his constant rebellious behaviour displeased his mother to such an extent that she would chastise him by calling him "The Beast" (from the Book of Revelation), an epithet that Crowley would later adopt for himself. He objected to the labelling of what he saw as life's most worthwhile and enjoyable activities as "sinful"."

From an article(link below)

"A plot of land once owned by the self-proclaimed "most wicked man in the world" has been put up for sale, attracting interest from rock stars, developers and disciples of the dark arts.

Boleskine Bay, on Loch Ness at Foyers, was part of an estate renowned at the start of the 20th century as "a centre of black magic, evil and sorcery" under the ownership and influence of satanist Aleister Crowley.

The "Beast of Boleskine", who died in 1947, owned Boleskine Estate between 1899 and 1913, during which time he tried to smother the Highlands in black magic by coaxing out the forces of evil.

The estate, once the home of millionaire rock star Jimmy Page, has been linked to a number of incidents over the years, including at least two violent deaths.

Crowley and his disciples used drugs, sex and blood sacrifices of goats and cats during debauched rituals. The black magician also took pleasure in the suffering that his sinister practices apparently brought to local villagers. He bragged about how an employee of the Boleskine estate got drunk one night - after 20 years of abstinence - and attempted to kill his wife and children.

The family of Crowley's lodge keeper, Hugh Gillies, also suffered a series of tragedies. First his 10-year-old daughter died suddenly at her school desk and a year later his 15-month-old son died of convulsions on his mother's knee.

Such is the reputation of the white-stoned home of sorcery that during his three years in residence, at the beginning of the 20th century, the villagers of Foyers avoided the estate at all costs.

Although Crowley died penniless in 1947, the years have not erased the memories of his association with the Scottish Highlands home. Visitors to the estate have reported seeing lights flashing on and off by themselves, windows shattering and a chair which belonged to Crowley moving on its own.

In 1960 the then owner of the house, Major Edward Grant, shot himself in the bedroom which had been used by Crowley for some of his satanic rituals."

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